Don’t Wander Away

“Failure comes only when we forget our ideals and objectives and principles and begin to wander away from the road that leads to their realization.” – Jawaharlal Nehru

This could potentially be a wake-up call to many of us, a summons to redefine “failure” in our lives. As Jawaharlal states here, failure is not necessarily a lack of success in doing things that other people think we should do. Nor does it lie in failing to live up to the expectations of others. If either of these things occur, then it is simply a lack of success, and an opportunity for us to learn from the experience. Jawaharlal tells us that failure is much deeper than this; it is when we stop being authentic, when we stop being true to ourselves, our values, and our integrity.

When we look at failure in such a way, as long as we stay true to our principles, then we cannot fail, no matter what the outcomes may be. A loss on the surface may be a victory inside if we have made decisions based on our ideals rather than on expediency or the wishes of others.

If we look at failure realistically, then we will see that we define failure ourselves, and what many would consider a failure most definitely is not so, as long as we are being true to our authentic selves and our principles and ideals. But if we are not true to ourselves, then are efforts will be fruitless.

Be a man of principle today.

Questions to consider:

Why do others want us to feel that we have failed if we do not live up to their expectations?

Who defines “failure” in your life? Do you allow them to do so?

How do you define “failure” yourself? If you stick to your principles and ethical ideals, can you really fail?

For further thought:

“There really is no such thing as failure. There is only the rearrangement of plans and surrender of ego.” – Susan Falter-Barns

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Commentary, Food For Thought, Living, Opinion

2 responses to “Don’t Wander Away

  1. Good piece. Just a small typo. Nehru’s full name is Jawaharlal Nehru (with L in it and not ‘i’). Cheers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s